Secrets of Paper and Ink by Lindsay Harrel | A Book Review

First of all, let me thank Thomas Nelson Publishers for the chance to read and review this book:
The Secrets of Paper and Ink by Lindsay Harrel
As always, these thoughts are my own.
I give this story 3.5 stars.

Check out this story on    Goodreads       |        Amazon       |      Thomas Nelson

 

Synopsis: Lindsay Harrel presents a powerful story of healing, forgiveness, and finding the courage to write your own story. In Secrets of Paper and Ink:

A year after the death of her abusive fiancé, domestic violence counselor Sophia Barrett finds returning to work too painful. She escapes to Cornwall, England–a place she’s learned to love through the words of her favorite author–and finds a place to stay with the requirement that she help out in the bookstore underneath the room she’s renting. Given her love of all things literary, it seems like the perfect place to find peace.

Ginny Rose is an American living in Cornwall, sure that if she saves the bookstore she co-owns with her husband then she can save her marriage as well. Fighting to keep the first place she feels like she belongs, she brainstorms with her brother-in-law, William, and Sophia to try to keep the charming bookstore afloat.

Two hundred years before, governess Emily Fairfax knew two things for certain: she wanted to be a published author, and she was in love with her childhood best friend. But he was a wealthy heir and well out of her league. Sophia discovers Emily’s journals, and she and William embark on a mission to find out more about this mysterious and determined woman, all the while getting closer to each other as they get closer to the truth.

The lives of the three women intertwine as each learns the power she has over the story of her life.

 

My thoughts:

This book is incredibly well reviewed. So let’s just start off with me saying that I don’t typically enjoy women’s fiction. This book I thought might be different, about books and writers, with a dash of historical fiction thrown in. Overall, I found it to be an easy read, light, and sweet.

 

I struggled through, weirdly enough, because so many of the side character’s names were so similar. I was confused about why three different POV characters were used heavily, though the book is mainly just about one: Sophia. Ginny’s story could have been told just as well if not better through Sophia’s point of view. The historical fiction sections were truly enjoyable, and as I said, this book is VERY highly reviewed! So even if it wasn’t my favorite, it could easily be yours.

What do you think?